Latest Space Missions 19 MAR Whole Lotta Shakin' Earthside


#61

It was a dumb idea to start with. Everybody knows the moon is made of cheese. You can’t grow cotton on cheese.


#62

I was wondering what purpose cotton served. I can see the need to grow food but is someone planning on expanding the textile market? :smile:


#63

The full eclipse begins at 0440 GMT in the UK and will appear red at 0512 GMT, according to the Royal Astronomical Society

“Viewers will see a normal full moon at first starting at around 10:35 p.m. Eastern time,” said Walter Freeman, assistant teaching professor at Syracuse University’s College of Arts and Sciences’ physics department. “At that time, the Earth’s shadow will begin to pass in front of the moon, blocking almost all of the sun’s light from reaching it. Observers will see the moon appear to be progressively ‘swallowed up’ starting from the lower left. This process will end at 11:40 p.m., when the Earth’s shadow covers the whole of the moon’s surface; this is the beginning of ‘totality.’ This will last until around 12:40 a.m., when the motion of the Earth’s shadow will carry it past the moon, and the moon will gradually again be lit by the sun. At 1:45 a.m., the moon will be fully visible again.”


#64

Can I just say that seeing a darkened reddish brown moon in the sky is surreal.
My brother does some astrophotography. Here is a pic he captured.


Here is my truely hideous pic from my phone, lol.


#65

#66

A question. If you view the pic my brother took during the eclipse,


you will see 2 bright specs in the lower left 1/4. Compared against others which caught the lunar impact, does it seem my brother actually caught the meteor (possibly 2 or a broken one) before impact? You will need to orient the pics to match.


#67

I hope you sent this to NASA.


#68

He is supposed to be looking at the other pics he took around it because he took quite a few in rapid succession.


#69

I doubt it would have been that bright when incoming. It was a relatively small pebble, its albedo would have to be staggering to be visible on a low-exposure shot…


#70

#71

Some of those are very funny lol


#72


Vegetation currently growing on the island


#73

Except there’s air, and nitrogen in the soil, and a lot more sunlight, and no radiation, and…
Seriously, that statement is a spherical cow in a vacuum if ever I saw one… :roll_eyes:


#74

Totally agree…


#75

Granted, it’s not like the Mars of today.

But four billion years ago…


#76

#77

In other news: rest in peace, Oppy! :disappointed_relieved:


#78


#79

#80